Chandigarh 1 (of 4): Le Corbusier’s urban design and planning

Corbusier’s urban design for Chandigarh is seen in the west as a disaster. This assessment dates from the 1950s, ’60s and ’70s, when the roads had few motor vehicles and the roadside trees were saplings (see photos of Chandigarh’s roads, below). Corbusier’s Rule of the Seven Roads then seemed ridiculous. But Chandigarh, like most Indian cities is now thronged with vehicles and they can move about more easily in Chandigarh than in other Indian cities. The above video reviews Chandigarh’s planning, urban design and landscape architecture – and agrees with Indian critics that ‘it’s pretty darn good’. Corbusier’s design for the Capitol project will be the subject of a future video. See also: The landscape architecture of Le Corbusier and the other Pioneer Modern Masters

Chandigarh's roads were bare and empty when westerners began criticising the design of the new town. Today, the roads are very busy and well-shaded by banyan trees (photo from The Rotarian, 1959). They are now well-shaded, busy and convenient (right, photo in 2013)

Chandigarh’s roads were bare and empty when westerners began criticising the design of the new town. Today, the roads are very busy, shaded by banyan trees, busy and convenient (left photo from The Rotarian, 1959, and right photo taken in 2013)

Four posts re Chandigarh urban planning, landscape architecture and garden design

Tom Turner

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